Seanachai ?

From Wikipedia

A seanchaí ([ˈʃan̪ˠəxiː] or [ʃan̪ˠəˈxiː] – plural: seanchaithe [ˈʃan̪ˠəxɪhɪ]) is a traditional Irish storyteller. A commonly encountered English spelling of the Irish word is shanachie.

The word seanchaí, which was spelled seanchaidhe (plural seanchaidhthe) before the Irish-language spelling reform of 1948, means a bearer of “old lore” (seanchas). In the ancient Celtic culture, the history and laws of the people were not written down but memorized in long lyric poems which were recited by bards (filí), in a tradition echoed by the seanchaithe.

Seanchaithe used to be servants to chiefs of their tribe and kept track of important information for their clan.They were very well respected in their Clan. The seanchaithe made use of a range of storytelling conventions, styles of speech and gestures that were peculiar to the Irish folk tradition and characterized them as practitioners of their art. Although tales from literary sources found their way into the repertoires of the seanchaithe, a traditional characteristic of their art was the way in which a large corpus of tales was passed from one practitioner to another without ever being written down.

Because of their role as custodians of an indigenous non-literary tradition, the seanchaithe are widely acknowledged to have inherited – although informally – the function of the filí of pre-Christian Ireland.

Some seanchaithe however were not part of a clan , some were itinerants, traveling from one community to another offering their skills in exchange for food and temporary shelter. Others, however, were members of a settled community and might be termed “village storytellers” who told their marvelous stories and tales at ceremonies and community events, simialar to the servant Seanchaithe. The distinctive role and craft of the seanchaí  is particularly associated with the Gaeltacht (the Irish-speaking areas of Ireland), although storytellers recognizable as seanchaithe were also to be found in rural areas throughout English-speaking Ireland. In their storytelling, some displayed archaic Hiberno-English idiom and vocabulary distinct from the style of ordinary conversation.

 

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